Land mammals form eight functionally and climatically distinct faunas in North America but only one in Europe

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Aim We use cluster analysis to delimit climatically and functionally distinct mammalian faunal clusters. These entities form regional species pools and are relevant to community assembly processes. Similar clusters can be differentiated in the fossil record, offering the potential for use as palaeoenvironmental proxies. Location North America within W178 degrees, W14 degrees, N83 degrees, N7 degrees and Europe within W32 degrees, E35 degrees, N80 degrees, N35 degrees. Major taxa studied 575 and 124 land mammal species from North America and Europe. Methods K-means clustering was used to subdivide North America and Europe into distinct faunas ranging in number from 3 (largest scale) to 21 (smallest scale). Each set of faunas was tested for significant differences in climate (mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature) and functional traits (body mass, locomotion and diet). Results In North America, climatic differentiation exists at the scale where mammals are divided into 11 or fewer distinct faunas and, in Europe, at the scale where there are five or fewer faunas. Functional trait differentiation in body mass occurs at a larger spatial scale in North America (8 distinct faunas), but locomotor differentiation is present at all spatial scales, and dietary differentiation is not present at any scale. No significant differentiation in any functional trait at any scale was found in Europe. Main conclusions Faunal clusters can be constructed at any spatial scale, but clusters are climatically and functionally meaningful only at larger scales. Climatic (and environmental) differences and their associated functional trait specialisations are likely to be barriers to large-scale mixing. We argue, therefore, that functionally and climatically distinct faunal clusters are the entities that form regional species pools for community assembly processes. In North America, there are eight such mammal pools, but only one in Europe. Since the functional traits in our study are observable in the fossil record, functional trait analysis can potentially be used to diagnose climatically distinct regions in the past.

Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftJournal of Biogeography
Volym46
Utgåva1
Sidor (från-till)185-195
Antal sidor11
ISSN0305-0270
DOI
StatusPublicerad - jan 2019
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 1171 Geovetenskaper

Citera det här

@article{3847b8684101435b8d64c27393e77e52,
title = "Land mammals form eight functionally and climatically distinct faunas in North America but only one in Europe",
abstract = "Aim We use cluster analysis to delimit climatically and functionally distinct mammalian faunal clusters. These entities form regional species pools and are relevant to community assembly processes. Similar clusters can be differentiated in the fossil record, offering the potential for use as palaeoenvironmental proxies. Location North America within W178 degrees, W14 degrees, N83 degrees, N7 degrees and Europe within W32 degrees, E35 degrees, N80 degrees, N35 degrees. Major taxa studied 575 and 124 land mammal species from North America and Europe. Methods K-means clustering was used to subdivide North America and Europe into distinct faunas ranging in number from 3 (largest scale) to 21 (smallest scale). Each set of faunas was tested for significant differences in climate (mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature) and functional traits (body mass, locomotion and diet). Results In North America, climatic differentiation exists at the scale where mammals are divided into 11 or fewer distinct faunas and, in Europe, at the scale where there are five or fewer faunas. Functional trait differentiation in body mass occurs at a larger spatial scale in North America (8 distinct faunas), but locomotor differentiation is present at all spatial scales, and dietary differentiation is not present at any scale. No significant differentiation in any functional trait at any scale was found in Europe. Main conclusions Faunal clusters can be constructed at any spatial scale, but clusters are climatically and functionally meaningful only at larger scales. Climatic (and environmental) differences and their associated functional trait specialisations are likely to be barriers to large-scale mixing. We argue, therefore, that functionally and climatically distinct faunal clusters are the entities that form regional species pools for community assembly processes. In North America, there are eight such mammal pools, but only one in Europe. Since the functional traits in our study are observable in the fossil record, functional trait analysis can potentially be used to diagnose climatically distinct regions in the past.",
keywords = "1171 Geosciences, climate variables, clustering, communities, Europe, faunal sorting, functional traits, mammals, North America, species pools, ECOREGIONS MAP, PATTERNS, COMMUNITIES, BIOGEOGRAPHY, ENVIRONMENT, TRAITS",
author = "Kari Lintulaakso and P.D. Polly and Jussi Eronen",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jbi.13480",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "185--195",
journal = "Journal of Biogeography",
issn = "0305-0270",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "1",

}

Land mammals form eight functionally and climatically distinct faunas in North America but only one in Europe. / Lintulaakso, Kari; Polly, P.D.; Eronen, Jussi.

I: Journal of Biogeography, Vol. 46, Nr. 1, 01.2019, s. 185-195.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Land mammals form eight functionally and climatically distinct faunas in North America but only one in Europe

AU - Lintulaakso, Kari

AU - Polly, P.D.

AU - Eronen, Jussi

PY - 2019/1

Y1 - 2019/1

N2 - Aim We use cluster analysis to delimit climatically and functionally distinct mammalian faunal clusters. These entities form regional species pools and are relevant to community assembly processes. Similar clusters can be differentiated in the fossil record, offering the potential for use as palaeoenvironmental proxies. Location North America within W178 degrees, W14 degrees, N83 degrees, N7 degrees and Europe within W32 degrees, E35 degrees, N80 degrees, N35 degrees. Major taxa studied 575 and 124 land mammal species from North America and Europe. Methods K-means clustering was used to subdivide North America and Europe into distinct faunas ranging in number from 3 (largest scale) to 21 (smallest scale). Each set of faunas was tested for significant differences in climate (mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature) and functional traits (body mass, locomotion and diet). Results In North America, climatic differentiation exists at the scale where mammals are divided into 11 or fewer distinct faunas and, in Europe, at the scale where there are five or fewer faunas. Functional trait differentiation in body mass occurs at a larger spatial scale in North America (8 distinct faunas), but locomotor differentiation is present at all spatial scales, and dietary differentiation is not present at any scale. No significant differentiation in any functional trait at any scale was found in Europe. Main conclusions Faunal clusters can be constructed at any spatial scale, but clusters are climatically and functionally meaningful only at larger scales. Climatic (and environmental) differences and their associated functional trait specialisations are likely to be barriers to large-scale mixing. We argue, therefore, that functionally and climatically distinct faunal clusters are the entities that form regional species pools for community assembly processes. In North America, there are eight such mammal pools, but only one in Europe. Since the functional traits in our study are observable in the fossil record, functional trait analysis can potentially be used to diagnose climatically distinct regions in the past.

AB - Aim We use cluster analysis to delimit climatically and functionally distinct mammalian faunal clusters. These entities form regional species pools and are relevant to community assembly processes. Similar clusters can be differentiated in the fossil record, offering the potential for use as palaeoenvironmental proxies. Location North America within W178 degrees, W14 degrees, N83 degrees, N7 degrees and Europe within W32 degrees, E35 degrees, N80 degrees, N35 degrees. Major taxa studied 575 and 124 land mammal species from North America and Europe. Methods K-means clustering was used to subdivide North America and Europe into distinct faunas ranging in number from 3 (largest scale) to 21 (smallest scale). Each set of faunas was tested for significant differences in climate (mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature) and functional traits (body mass, locomotion and diet). Results In North America, climatic differentiation exists at the scale where mammals are divided into 11 or fewer distinct faunas and, in Europe, at the scale where there are five or fewer faunas. Functional trait differentiation in body mass occurs at a larger spatial scale in North America (8 distinct faunas), but locomotor differentiation is present at all spatial scales, and dietary differentiation is not present at any scale. No significant differentiation in any functional trait at any scale was found in Europe. Main conclusions Faunal clusters can be constructed at any spatial scale, but clusters are climatically and functionally meaningful only at larger scales. Climatic (and environmental) differences and their associated functional trait specialisations are likely to be barriers to large-scale mixing. We argue, therefore, that functionally and climatically distinct faunal clusters are the entities that form regional species pools for community assembly processes. In North America, there are eight such mammal pools, but only one in Europe. Since the functional traits in our study are observable in the fossil record, functional trait analysis can potentially be used to diagnose climatically distinct regions in the past.

KW - 1171 Geosciences

KW - climate variables

KW - clustering

KW - communities

KW - Europe

KW - faunal sorting

KW - functional traits

KW - mammals

KW - North America

KW - species pools

KW - ECOREGIONS MAP

KW - PATTERNS

KW - COMMUNITIES

KW - BIOGEOGRAPHY

KW - ENVIRONMENT

KW - TRAITS

U2 - 10.1111/jbi.13480

DO - 10.1111/jbi.13480

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 185

EP - 195

JO - Journal of Biogeography

JF - Journal of Biogeography

SN - 0305-0270

IS - 1

ER -