Maternal and neonatal characteristics in obstetric intensive care unit admissions

P.M. Seppänen, R.T. Sund, J.T. Uotila, M.T. Helminen, T.M. Suominen

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the course of pregnancy and delivery of obstetric patients admitted for intensive care, and determine the health status of their infants. Methods This was a retrospective register-based study. Four university hospitals in Finland participated. Obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit in any trimester of pregnancy, during delivery or up to 42 days post partum were identified from clinical information systems over a five-year study period. Parturient and infant data were collected from the Medical Birth Register. Results During the study period (2007–2011), 283 obstetric patients were identified from the clinical information system. The most common reason for admission was hypertensive complications (58%), followed by obstetric haemorrhage (25.1%). Advanced maternal age, nulliparity and multiple pregnancies were associated with obstetric intensive care unit admissions. Of patients admitted to intensive care, 68.9% delivered by unscheduled caesarean section. Nearly 60% of neonates were born preterm, 56.1% needed treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit or an observation unit and 4.6% died within one week. Conclusion Advanced maternal age, nulliparity and multiple pregnancy were more common among intensive care unit-admitted women than in the general obstetric population. The main causes for admission were hypertensive complications and obstetric haemorrhage. Compared with the general obstetric population, neonates of intensive care unit-admitted mothers were eight times more likely to require treatment on a neonatal ward and their risk of neonatal death was also eight times greater.
Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftInternational Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia
ISSN0959-289X
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 6 jul 2019
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 3123 Kvinno- och barnsjukdomar

Citera det här

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title = "Maternal and neonatal characteristics in obstetric intensive care unit admissions",
abstract = "Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the course of pregnancy and delivery of obstetric patients admitted for intensive care, and determine the health status of their infants. Methods This was a retrospective register-based study. Four university hospitals in Finland participated. Obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit in any trimester of pregnancy, during delivery or up to 42 days post partum were identified from clinical information systems over a five-year study period. Parturient and infant data were collected from the Medical Birth Register. Results During the study period (2007–2011), 283 obstetric patients were identified from the clinical information system. The most common reason for admission was hypertensive complications (58{\%}), followed by obstetric haemorrhage (25.1{\%}). Advanced maternal age, nulliparity and multiple pregnancies were associated with obstetric intensive care unit admissions. Of patients admitted to intensive care, 68.9{\%} delivered by unscheduled caesarean section. Nearly 60{\%} of neonates were born preterm, 56.1{\%} needed treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit or an observation unit and 4.6{\%} died within one week. Conclusion Advanced maternal age, nulliparity and multiple pregnancy were more common among intensive care unit-admitted women than in the general obstetric population. The main causes for admission were hypertensive complications and obstetric haemorrhage. Compared with the general obstetric population, neonates of intensive care unit-admitted mothers were eight times more likely to require treatment on a neonatal ward and their risk of neonatal death was also eight times greater.",
keywords = "Delivery, Labour, Obstetrics, Pregnancy complications, Risk factors, 3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics",
author = "P.M. Sepp{\"a}nen and R.T. Sund and J.T. Uotila and M.T. Helminen and T.M. Suominen",
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Maternal and neonatal characteristics in obstetric intensive care unit admissions. / Seppänen, P.M.; Sund, R.T.; Uotila, J.T.; Helminen, M.T.; Suominen, T.M.

I: International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia, 06.07.2019.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maternal and neonatal characteristics in obstetric intensive care unit admissions

AU - Seppänen, P.M.

AU - Sund, R.T.

AU - Uotila, J.T.

AU - Helminen, M.T.

AU - Suominen, T.M.

PY - 2019/7/6

Y1 - 2019/7/6

N2 - Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the course of pregnancy and delivery of obstetric patients admitted for intensive care, and determine the health status of their infants. Methods This was a retrospective register-based study. Four university hospitals in Finland participated. Obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit in any trimester of pregnancy, during delivery or up to 42 days post partum were identified from clinical information systems over a five-year study period. Parturient and infant data were collected from the Medical Birth Register. Results During the study period (2007–2011), 283 obstetric patients were identified from the clinical information system. The most common reason for admission was hypertensive complications (58%), followed by obstetric haemorrhage (25.1%). Advanced maternal age, nulliparity and multiple pregnancies were associated with obstetric intensive care unit admissions. Of patients admitted to intensive care, 68.9% delivered by unscheduled caesarean section. Nearly 60% of neonates were born preterm, 56.1% needed treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit or an observation unit and 4.6% died within one week. Conclusion Advanced maternal age, nulliparity and multiple pregnancy were more common among intensive care unit-admitted women than in the general obstetric population. The main causes for admission were hypertensive complications and obstetric haemorrhage. Compared with the general obstetric population, neonates of intensive care unit-admitted mothers were eight times more likely to require treatment on a neonatal ward and their risk of neonatal death was also eight times greater.

AB - Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the course of pregnancy and delivery of obstetric patients admitted for intensive care, and determine the health status of their infants. Methods This was a retrospective register-based study. Four university hospitals in Finland participated. Obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit in any trimester of pregnancy, during delivery or up to 42 days post partum were identified from clinical information systems over a five-year study period. Parturient and infant data were collected from the Medical Birth Register. Results During the study period (2007–2011), 283 obstetric patients were identified from the clinical information system. The most common reason for admission was hypertensive complications (58%), followed by obstetric haemorrhage (25.1%). Advanced maternal age, nulliparity and multiple pregnancies were associated with obstetric intensive care unit admissions. Of patients admitted to intensive care, 68.9% delivered by unscheduled caesarean section. Nearly 60% of neonates were born preterm, 56.1% needed treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit or an observation unit and 4.6% died within one week. Conclusion Advanced maternal age, nulliparity and multiple pregnancy were more common among intensive care unit-admitted women than in the general obstetric population. The main causes for admission were hypertensive complications and obstetric haemorrhage. Compared with the general obstetric population, neonates of intensive care unit-admitted mothers were eight times more likely to require treatment on a neonatal ward and their risk of neonatal death was also eight times greater.

KW - Delivery

KW - Labour

KW - Obstetrics

KW - Pregnancy complications

KW - Risk factors

KW - 3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijoa.2019.07.002

DO - 10.1016/j.ijoa.2019.07.002

M3 - Article

JO - International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia

JF - International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia

SN - 0959-289X

ER -