Patterning of the turtle shell

Jacqueline Moustakas-Verho, Judith Cebra-Thomas, Scott Gilbert

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Interest in the origin and evolution of the turtle shell has resulted in a most unlikely clade becoming an important research group for investigating morphological diversity in developmental biology. Many turtles generate a two-component shell that nearly surrounds the body in a bony exoskeleton. The ectoderm covering the shell produces epidermal scutes that form a phylogenetically stable pattern. In some lineages, the bones of the shell and their ectodermal covering become reduced or lost, and this is generally associated with different ecological habits. The similarity and diversity of turtles allows research into how changes in development create evolutionary novelty, interacting modules, and adaptive physiology and anatomy.
Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftCurrent Opinion in Genetics & Development
Volym45
Sidor (från-till)124-131
Antal sidor8
ISSN0959-437X
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 2017
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 1184 Genetik, utvecklingsbiologi, fysiologi
  • 1181 Ekologi, evolutionsbiologi
  • 111 Matematik

Citera det här

Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline ; Cebra-Thomas, Judith ; Gilbert, Scott. / Patterning of the turtle shell. I: Current Opinion in Genetics & Development. 2017 ; Vol. 45. s. 124-131.
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Patterning of the turtle shell. / Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline; Cebra-Thomas, Judith; Gilbert, Scott.

I: Current Opinion in Genetics & Development, Vol. 45, 2017, s. 124-131.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

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KW - 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology

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