Prenatal exposure to maternal very severe obesity is associated with impaired neurodevelopment and executive functioning in children

Theresia H. Mina, Marius Lahti, Amanda J. Drake, Fiona C. Denison, Katri Räikkönen, Jane E. Norman, Rebecca M. Reynolds

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Background

Prenatal maternal obesity has been associated with an increased risk of neurocognitive problems in childhood, but there are fewer studies on executive functioning.

Methods

Tests and questionnaires to assess neurodevelopment, executive functioning, and the ability to delay gratification were conducted in 113 children (mean (SD)=4.24 (0.63) years of age) born to mothers with very severe obesity (SO, body mass index (BMI)⩾40 kg/m2, n=51) or to lean mothers (BMI⩽25 kg/m2, n=62).
Results

Prenatal maternal SO predicted poorer neurodevelopment (unstandardized regression coefficient (B)=−0.42, 95% confidence interval (CI) (−0.82; −0.02)), worse problem-solving (odd ratio (OR)=0.60, 95% CI (1.13; 0.07)), and fine motor skills (OR=4.91, 95% CI (1.27; 19.04)), poorer executive functioning in areas of attention, inhibitory control, and working memory (standardized B=3.75, 95% CI (1.01; 13.93)) but not in self-gratification delay. The effects were independent of maternal concurrent psychological well-being and child’s BMI, but not independent of maternal education.
Conclusion

Future studies should investigate whether perinatal management of maternal obesity could prevent adverse outcomes in child neurodevelopment.
Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftPediatric Research
Volym82
Utgåva1
Sidor (från-till)47-54
Antal sidor8
ISSN0031-3998
DOI
StatusPublicerad - jul 2017
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 515 Psykologi

Citera det här

Mina, Theresia H. ; Lahti, Marius ; Drake, Amanda J. ; Denison, Fiona C. ; Räikkönen, Katri ; Norman, Jane E. ; Reynolds, Rebecca M. / Prenatal exposure to maternal very severe obesity is associated with impaired neurodevelopment and executive functioning in children. I: Pediatric Research. 2017 ; Vol. 82, Nr. 1. s. 47-54.
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title = "Prenatal exposure to maternal very severe obesity is associated with impaired neurodevelopment and executive functioning in children",
abstract = "BackgroundPrenatal maternal obesity has been associated with an increased risk of neurocognitive problems in childhood, but there are fewer studies on executive functioning.MethodsTests and questionnaires to assess neurodevelopment, executive functioning, and the ability to delay gratification were conducted in 113 children (mean (SD)=4.24 (0.63) years of age) born to mothers with very severe obesity (SO, body mass index (BMI)⩾40 kg/m2, n=51) or to lean mothers (BMI⩽25 kg/m2, n=62).ResultsPrenatal maternal SO predicted poorer neurodevelopment (unstandardized regression coefficient (B)=−0.42, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) (−0.82; −0.02)), worse problem-solving (odd ratio (OR)=0.60, 95{\%} CI (1.13; 0.07)), and fine motor skills (OR=4.91, 95{\%} CI (1.27; 19.04)), poorer executive functioning in areas of attention, inhibitory control, and working memory (standardized B=3.75, 95{\%} CI (1.01; 13.93)) but not in self-gratification delay. The effects were independent of maternal concurrent psychological well-being and child’s BMI, but not independent of maternal education.ConclusionFuture studies should investigate whether perinatal management of maternal obesity could prevent adverse outcomes in child neurodevelopment.",
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author = "Mina, {Theresia H.} and Marius Lahti and Drake, {Amanda J.} and Denison, {Fiona C.} and Katri R{\"a}ikk{\"o}nen and Norman, {Jane E.} and Reynolds, {Rebecca M.}",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1038/pr.2017.43",
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Prenatal exposure to maternal very severe obesity is associated with impaired neurodevelopment and executive functioning in children. / Mina, Theresia H.; Lahti, Marius; Drake, Amanda J.; Denison, Fiona C.; Räikkönen, Katri; Norman, Jane E.; Reynolds, Rebecca M.

I: Pediatric Research, Vol. 82, Nr. 1, 07.2017, s. 47-54.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prenatal exposure to maternal very severe obesity is associated with impaired neurodevelopment and executive functioning in children

AU - Mina, Theresia H.

AU - Lahti, Marius

AU - Drake, Amanda J.

AU - Denison, Fiona C.

AU - Räikkönen, Katri

AU - Norman, Jane E.

AU - Reynolds, Rebecca M.

PY - 2017/7

Y1 - 2017/7

N2 - BackgroundPrenatal maternal obesity has been associated with an increased risk of neurocognitive problems in childhood, but there are fewer studies on executive functioning.MethodsTests and questionnaires to assess neurodevelopment, executive functioning, and the ability to delay gratification were conducted in 113 children (mean (SD)=4.24 (0.63) years of age) born to mothers with very severe obesity (SO, body mass index (BMI)⩾40 kg/m2, n=51) or to lean mothers (BMI⩽25 kg/m2, n=62).ResultsPrenatal maternal SO predicted poorer neurodevelopment (unstandardized regression coefficient (B)=−0.42, 95% confidence interval (CI) (−0.82; −0.02)), worse problem-solving (odd ratio (OR)=0.60, 95% CI (1.13; 0.07)), and fine motor skills (OR=4.91, 95% CI (1.27; 19.04)), poorer executive functioning in areas of attention, inhibitory control, and working memory (standardized B=3.75, 95% CI (1.01; 13.93)) but not in self-gratification delay. The effects were independent of maternal concurrent psychological well-being and child’s BMI, but not independent of maternal education.ConclusionFuture studies should investigate whether perinatal management of maternal obesity could prevent adverse outcomes in child neurodevelopment.

AB - BackgroundPrenatal maternal obesity has been associated with an increased risk of neurocognitive problems in childhood, but there are fewer studies on executive functioning.MethodsTests and questionnaires to assess neurodevelopment, executive functioning, and the ability to delay gratification were conducted in 113 children (mean (SD)=4.24 (0.63) years of age) born to mothers with very severe obesity (SO, body mass index (BMI)⩾40 kg/m2, n=51) or to lean mothers (BMI⩽25 kg/m2, n=62).ResultsPrenatal maternal SO predicted poorer neurodevelopment (unstandardized regression coefficient (B)=−0.42, 95% confidence interval (CI) (−0.82; −0.02)), worse problem-solving (odd ratio (OR)=0.60, 95% CI (1.13; 0.07)), and fine motor skills (OR=4.91, 95% CI (1.27; 19.04)), poorer executive functioning in areas of attention, inhibitory control, and working memory (standardized B=3.75, 95% CI (1.01; 13.93)) but not in self-gratification delay. The effects were independent of maternal concurrent psychological well-being and child’s BMI, but not independent of maternal education.ConclusionFuture studies should investigate whether perinatal management of maternal obesity could prevent adverse outcomes in child neurodevelopment.

KW - 515 Psychology

KW - BODY-MASS INDEX

KW - WEIGHT-GAIN

KW - PREPREGNANCY OVERWEIGHT

KW - INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

KW - RISK-FACTORS

KW - PREGNANCY

KW - AGE

KW - CHILDHOOD

KW - GRATIFICATION

KW - COGNITION

U2 - 10.1038/pr.2017.43

DO - 10.1038/pr.2017.43

M3 - Article

VL - 82

SP - 47

EP - 54

JO - Pediatric Research

JF - Pediatric Research

SN - 0031-3998

IS - 1

ER -