Psychosocial work environment and cross-cultural competence among native and foreign-born registered nurses

Karolina Wesolowska, Marko Elovainio, Kia Gluschkoff, Laura Hietapakka, Anu-Marja Kaihlanen, Salla Lehtoaro, Tarja Heponiemi

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Cross‐cultural competence is an essential component of the nursing profession, but little is known about the specific psychosocial work characteristics that potentially promote or hinder such competence. In the present study, psychosocial work characteristics were based on Karasek's Job Demand—Control Model. The researchers examined whether Karasek's psychosocial work characteristics, such as high‐strain jobs, high‐strain isolated jobs, active jobs, and active collective jobs, are associated with cross‐cultural competence (empathy, skills, positive attitudes, and motivation), and whether there are differences between native and foreign‐born registered nurses (RN) in these potential associations. A random sample of 744 native RNs (91.0% women) and a total sample (n = 212) of foreign‐born RNs (94.3% women) working in Finland were used. Data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed with a series of multiple linear regression analyses. High‐strain and high‐strain isolated jobs were negatively associated with all four dimensions of cross‐cultural competence. Active collective jobs, but not active jobs, were positively associated with cross‐cultural skills. There were no differences between native and migrant nurses in these associations. The psychosocial work environment is associated with cross‐cultural competence in both native and migrant nurses. Improvements in psychosocial working conditions, especially minimizing negative factors in the work environment, such as high‐strain and high‐strain isolated jobs, may need to be considered as a part of the efforts aimed to enhance cross‐cultural competence among nursing personnel.
Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftResearch in Nursing & Health
Volym42
Utgåva5
Sidor (från-till)349-357
Antal sidor9
ISSN0160-6891
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 16 jul 2019
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 515 Psykologi

Citera det här

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title = "Psychosocial work environment and cross-cultural competence among native and foreign-born registered nurses",
abstract = "Cross‐cultural competence is an essential component of the nursing profession, but little is known about the specific psychosocial work characteristics that potentially promote or hinder such competence. In the present study, psychosocial work characteristics were based on Karasek's Job Demand—Control Model. The researchers examined whether Karasek's psychosocial work characteristics, such as high‐strain jobs, high‐strain isolated jobs, active jobs, and active collective jobs, are associated with cross‐cultural competence (empathy, skills, positive attitudes, and motivation), and whether there are differences between native and foreign‐born registered nurses (RN) in these potential associations. A random sample of 744 native RNs (91.0{\%} women) and a total sample (n = 212) of foreign‐born RNs (94.3{\%} women) working in Finland were used. Data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed with a series of multiple linear regression analyses. High‐strain and high‐strain isolated jobs were negatively associated with all four dimensions of cross‐cultural competence. Active collective jobs, but not active jobs, were positively associated with cross‐cultural skills. There were no differences between native and migrant nurses in these associations. The psychosocial work environment is associated with cross‐cultural competence in both native and migrant nurses. Improvements in psychosocial working conditions, especially minimizing negative factors in the work environment, such as high‐strain and high‐strain isolated jobs, may need to be considered as a part of the efforts aimed to enhance cross‐cultural competence among nursing personnel.",
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Psychosocial work environment and cross-cultural competence among native and foreign-born registered nurses. / Wesolowska, Karolina; Elovainio, Marko; Gluschkoff, Kia; Hietapakka, Laura; Kaihlanen, Anu-Marja; Lehtoaro, Salla; Heponiemi, Tarja.

I: Research in Nursing & Health, Vol. 42, Nr. 5, 16.07.2019, s. 349-357.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Psychosocial work environment and cross-cultural competence among native and foreign-born registered nurses

AU - Wesolowska, Karolina

AU - Elovainio, Marko

AU - Gluschkoff, Kia

AU - Hietapakka, Laura

AU - Kaihlanen, Anu-Marja

AU - Lehtoaro, Salla

AU - Heponiemi, Tarja

PY - 2019/7/16

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N2 - Cross‐cultural competence is an essential component of the nursing profession, but little is known about the specific psychosocial work characteristics that potentially promote or hinder such competence. In the present study, psychosocial work characteristics were based on Karasek's Job Demand—Control Model. The researchers examined whether Karasek's psychosocial work characteristics, such as high‐strain jobs, high‐strain isolated jobs, active jobs, and active collective jobs, are associated with cross‐cultural competence (empathy, skills, positive attitudes, and motivation), and whether there are differences between native and foreign‐born registered nurses (RN) in these potential associations. A random sample of 744 native RNs (91.0% women) and a total sample (n = 212) of foreign‐born RNs (94.3% women) working in Finland were used. Data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed with a series of multiple linear regression analyses. High‐strain and high‐strain isolated jobs were negatively associated with all four dimensions of cross‐cultural competence. Active collective jobs, but not active jobs, were positively associated with cross‐cultural skills. There were no differences between native and migrant nurses in these associations. The psychosocial work environment is associated with cross‐cultural competence in both native and migrant nurses. Improvements in psychosocial working conditions, especially minimizing negative factors in the work environment, such as high‐strain and high‐strain isolated jobs, may need to be considered as a part of the efforts aimed to enhance cross‐cultural competence among nursing personnel.

AB - Cross‐cultural competence is an essential component of the nursing profession, but little is known about the specific psychosocial work characteristics that potentially promote or hinder such competence. In the present study, psychosocial work characteristics were based on Karasek's Job Demand—Control Model. The researchers examined whether Karasek's psychosocial work characteristics, such as high‐strain jobs, high‐strain isolated jobs, active jobs, and active collective jobs, are associated with cross‐cultural competence (empathy, skills, positive attitudes, and motivation), and whether there are differences between native and foreign‐born registered nurses (RN) in these potential associations. A random sample of 744 native RNs (91.0% women) and a total sample (n = 212) of foreign‐born RNs (94.3% women) working in Finland were used. Data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed with a series of multiple linear regression analyses. High‐strain and high‐strain isolated jobs were negatively associated with all four dimensions of cross‐cultural competence. Active collective jobs, but not active jobs, were positively associated with cross‐cultural skills. There were no differences between native and migrant nurses in these associations. The psychosocial work environment is associated with cross‐cultural competence in both native and migrant nurses. Improvements in psychosocial working conditions, especially minimizing negative factors in the work environment, such as high‐strain and high‐strain isolated jobs, may need to be considered as a part of the efforts aimed to enhance cross‐cultural competence among nursing personnel.

KW - active jobs

KW - cross-cultural competence

KW - high-strain jobs

KW - nurses

KW - psychosocial work environment characteristics

KW - JOB STRAIN

KW - SOCIAL SUPPORT

KW - ISO-STRAIN

KW - PHYSICIANS

KW - DEMANDS

KW - HEALTH

KW - RISK

KW - WORKPLACE

KW - ATTITUDES

KW - BURNOUT

KW - 515 Psychology

U2 - 10.1002/nur.21970

DO - 10.1002/nur.21970

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 349

EP - 357

JO - Research in Nursing & Health

JF - Research in Nursing & Health

SN - 0160-6891

IS - 5

ER -