Recent peat and carbon accumulation following the Little Ice Age in northwestern Quebec, Canada

Sanna Piilo, Hui Zhang, Michelle Garneau, Angela V. Gallego-Sala, Matthew Amesbury, Minna Väliranta

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Peatland ecosystems are important carbon sinks, but also release carbon back to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and methane. Peatlands therefore play an essential role in the global carbon cycle. However, the response of high-latitude peatlands to ongoing climate change is still not fully understood. In this study, we used plant macrofossils and peat property analyses as proxies to document changes in vegetation and peat and carbon accumulation after the Little Ice Age. Results from 12 peat monoliths collected in high-boreal and low-subarctic regions in northwestern Quebec, Canada, suggest high carbon accumulation rates for the recent past (post AD 1970s). Successional changes in plant assemblages were asynchronous within the cores in the southernmost region, but more consistent in the northern region. Average apparent recent carbon accumulation rates varied between 50.7 and 149.1 g C m(-2) yr(-1) with the northernmost study region showing higher values. The variation in vegetation records and peat properties found within samples taken from the same sites and amongst cores taken from different regions highlights the need to investigate multiple records from each peatland, but also from different peatlands within one region.

Originalspråkengelska
Artikelnummer075002
TidskriftEnvironmental Research Letters
Volym14
Utgåva7
Antal sidor14
ISSN1748-9326
DOI
StatusPublicerad - jul 2019
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 1172 Miljövetenskap

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title = "Recent peat and carbon accumulation following the Little Ice Age in northwestern Quebec, Canada",
abstract = "Peatland ecosystems are important carbon sinks, but also release carbon back to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and methane. Peatlands therefore play an essential role in the global carbon cycle. However, the response of high-latitude peatlands to ongoing climate change is still not fully understood. In this study, we used plant macrofossils and peat property analyses as proxies to document changes in vegetation and peat and carbon accumulation after the Little Ice Age. Results from 12 peat monoliths collected in high-boreal and low-subarctic regions in northwestern Quebec, Canada, suggest high carbon accumulation rates for the recent past (post AD 1970s). Successional changes in plant assemblages were asynchronous within the cores in the southernmost region, but more consistent in the northern region. Average apparent recent carbon accumulation rates varied between 50.7 and 149.1 g C m(-2) yr(-1) with the northernmost study region showing higher values. The variation in vegetation records and peat properties found within samples taken from the same sites and amongst cores taken from different regions highlights the need to investigate multiple records from each peatland, but also from different peatlands within one region.",
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author = "Sanna Piilo and Hui Zhang and Michelle Garneau and Gallego-Sala, {Angela V.} and Matthew Amesbury and Minna V{\"a}liranta",
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Recent peat and carbon accumulation following the Little Ice Age in northwestern Quebec, Canada. / Piilo, Sanna; Zhang, Hui; Garneau, Michelle; Gallego-Sala, Angela V.; Amesbury, Matthew; Väliranta, Minna.

I: Environmental Research Letters, Vol. 14, Nr. 7, 075002, 07.2019.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Recent peat and carbon accumulation following the Little Ice Age in northwestern Quebec, Canada

AU - Piilo, Sanna

AU - Zhang, Hui

AU - Garneau, Michelle

AU - Gallego-Sala, Angela V.

AU - Amesbury, Matthew

AU - Väliranta, Minna

PY - 2019/7

Y1 - 2019/7

N2 - Peatland ecosystems are important carbon sinks, but also release carbon back to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and methane. Peatlands therefore play an essential role in the global carbon cycle. However, the response of high-latitude peatlands to ongoing climate change is still not fully understood. In this study, we used plant macrofossils and peat property analyses as proxies to document changes in vegetation and peat and carbon accumulation after the Little Ice Age. Results from 12 peat monoliths collected in high-boreal and low-subarctic regions in northwestern Quebec, Canada, suggest high carbon accumulation rates for the recent past (post AD 1970s). Successional changes in plant assemblages were asynchronous within the cores in the southernmost region, but more consistent in the northern region. Average apparent recent carbon accumulation rates varied between 50.7 and 149.1 g C m(-2) yr(-1) with the northernmost study region showing higher values. The variation in vegetation records and peat properties found within samples taken from the same sites and amongst cores taken from different regions highlights the need to investigate multiple records from each peatland, but also from different peatlands within one region.

AB - Peatland ecosystems are important carbon sinks, but also release carbon back to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and methane. Peatlands therefore play an essential role in the global carbon cycle. However, the response of high-latitude peatlands to ongoing climate change is still not fully understood. In this study, we used plant macrofossils and peat property analyses as proxies to document changes in vegetation and peat and carbon accumulation after the Little Ice Age. Results from 12 peat monoliths collected in high-boreal and low-subarctic regions in northwestern Quebec, Canada, suggest high carbon accumulation rates for the recent past (post AD 1970s). Successional changes in plant assemblages were asynchronous within the cores in the southernmost region, but more consistent in the northern region. Average apparent recent carbon accumulation rates varied between 50.7 and 149.1 g C m(-2) yr(-1) with the northernmost study region showing higher values. The variation in vegetation records and peat properties found within samples taken from the same sites and amongst cores taken from different regions highlights the need to investigate multiple records from each peatland, but also from different peatlands within one region.

KW - 1172 Environmental sciences

KW - permafrost peatlands

KW - climate warming

KW - vegetation dynamics

KW - carbon accumulation

KW - plant macrofossil analysis

KW - SUB-ARCTIC PEATLANDS

KW - HUDSON-BAY LOWLANDS

KW - HOLOCENE CARBON

KW - PERMAFROST PEATLAND

KW - CLIMATE-CHANGE

KW - VEGETATION SUCCESSION

KW - OMBROTROPHIC PEATLANDS

KW - BOREAL

KW - DYNAMICS

KW - RADIOCARBON

U2 - 10.1088/1748-9326/ab11ec

DO - 10.1088/1748-9326/ab11ec

M3 - Article

VL - 14

JO - Environmental Research Letters

JF - Environmental Research Letters

SN - 1748-9326

IS - 7

M1 - 075002

ER -