Sammanfattning

The redox state of molecules in plants is constantly changing in response to the environment. During environmental stresses, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) tend to be higher, this drives oxidation of a plethora of molecules. ROS have a short lifetime and are chemically reduced by antioxidant molecules. This scavenging prevents ROS from damaging important biomolecules (e.g. DNA). The same ROS however also yields cues for plants, as ROS formation leads to changes in nuclear transcription. Therefore, scavenging of ROS goes together with ROS signalling. It remains largely unanswered however, how ROS produced in peroxisomes, mitochondria or chloroplasts reach the nucleus to affect gene expression. Glutathione peroxidases form one class of ROS-processing enzymes. These enzymes scavenge ROS and can then relay their oxidative state by resolving disulphide bridges of different proteins, thereby acting as transmitters of the ROS signal into the nucleus. Furthermore, Arabidopsis transcriptional regulator RCD1 as well as its yeast functional homolog YAP1, have been shown to interact with glutathione peroxidases in yeast two-hybrid systems. Therefore, RCD1 may act as the receiver of ROS-related signals in the nucleus. To understand the molecular details of this pathway, we are studying the interaction of RCD1 with glutathione peroxidases in vitro and vivo. In vitro, the effect of the interaction will be probed by dimedone-based labelling. In vivo interaction will be assessed by FRET-FLIM. Another possible means for ROS to reach the nucleus is through physical proximity of the organelles. Protrusions of the chloroplast envelope, named stromules, may directly reach nuclear pores in certain environmental conditions. Via the stromules, chloroplastic produced ROS could find its way to the nucleus and directly affect gene expression. We build reporters to study stromule dynamics and H2O2 abundance, which will be studied in vivo in mutants and under treatments related to ROS processing.
Originalspråkengelska
StatusPublicerad - 25 jun 2018
MoE-publikationstypEj behörig
EvenemangThe 29th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research - LOGOMO, Turku, Finland
Varaktighet: 25 jun 201829 jun 2018

Konferens

KonferensThe 29th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research
Förkortad titelICAR 2018
LandFinland
OrtTurku
Period25/06/201829/06/2018

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Gossens, R., Kangasjärvi, J. S., & Shapiguzov, A. (2018). Redox regulation of nuclear gene expression. Poster presenterad vid The 29th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research , Turku, Finland.
Gossens, Richard ; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko Sakari ; Shapiguzov, Alexey. / Redox regulation of nuclear gene expression. Poster presenterad vid The 29th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research , Turku, Finland.
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Gossens, R, Kangasjärvi, JS & Shapiguzov, A 2018, 'Redox regulation of nuclear gene expression' The 29th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research , Turku, Finland, 25/06/2018 - 29/06/2018, .

Redox regulation of nuclear gene expression. / Gossens, Richard; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko Sakari; Shapiguzov, Alexey.

2018. Poster presenterad vid The 29th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research , Turku, Finland.

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AU - Gossens, Richard

AU - Kangasjärvi, Jaakko Sakari

AU - Shapiguzov, Alexey

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N2 - The redox state of molecules in plants is constantly changing in response to the environment. During environmental stresses, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) tend to be higher, this drives oxidation of a plethora of molecules. ROS have a short lifetime and are chemically reduced by antioxidant molecules. This scavenging prevents ROS from damaging important biomolecules (e.g. DNA). The same ROS however also yields cues for plants, as ROS formation leads to changes in nuclear transcription. Therefore, scavenging of ROS goes together with ROS signalling. It remains largely unanswered however, how ROS produced in peroxisomes, mitochondria or chloroplasts reach the nucleus to affect gene expression. Glutathione peroxidases form one class of ROS-processing enzymes. These enzymes scavenge ROS and can then relay their oxidative state by resolving disulphide bridges of different proteins, thereby acting as transmitters of the ROS signal into the nucleus. Furthermore, Arabidopsis transcriptional regulator RCD1 as well as its yeast functional homolog YAP1, have been shown to interact with glutathione peroxidases in yeast two-hybrid systems. Therefore, RCD1 may act as the receiver of ROS-related signals in the nucleus. To understand the molecular details of this pathway, we are studying the interaction of RCD1 with glutathione peroxidases in vitro and vivo. In vitro, the effect of the interaction will be probed by dimedone-based labelling. In vivo interaction will be assessed by FRET-FLIM. Another possible means for ROS to reach the nucleus is through physical proximity of the organelles. Protrusions of the chloroplast envelope, named stromules, may directly reach nuclear pores in certain environmental conditions. Via the stromules, chloroplastic produced ROS could find its way to the nucleus and directly affect gene expression. We build reporters to study stromule dynamics and H2O2 abundance, which will be studied in vivo in mutants and under treatments related to ROS processing.

AB - The redox state of molecules in plants is constantly changing in response to the environment. During environmental stresses, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) tend to be higher, this drives oxidation of a plethora of molecules. ROS have a short lifetime and are chemically reduced by antioxidant molecules. This scavenging prevents ROS from damaging important biomolecules (e.g. DNA). The same ROS however also yields cues for plants, as ROS formation leads to changes in nuclear transcription. Therefore, scavenging of ROS goes together with ROS signalling. It remains largely unanswered however, how ROS produced in peroxisomes, mitochondria or chloroplasts reach the nucleus to affect gene expression. Glutathione peroxidases form one class of ROS-processing enzymes. These enzymes scavenge ROS and can then relay their oxidative state by resolving disulphide bridges of different proteins, thereby acting as transmitters of the ROS signal into the nucleus. Furthermore, Arabidopsis transcriptional regulator RCD1 as well as its yeast functional homolog YAP1, have been shown to interact with glutathione peroxidases in yeast two-hybrid systems. Therefore, RCD1 may act as the receiver of ROS-related signals in the nucleus. To understand the molecular details of this pathway, we are studying the interaction of RCD1 with glutathione peroxidases in vitro and vivo. In vitro, the effect of the interaction will be probed by dimedone-based labelling. In vivo interaction will be assessed by FRET-FLIM. Another possible means for ROS to reach the nucleus is through physical proximity of the organelles. Protrusions of the chloroplast envelope, named stromules, may directly reach nuclear pores in certain environmental conditions. Via the stromules, chloroplastic produced ROS could find its way to the nucleus and directly affect gene expression. We build reporters to study stromule dynamics and H2O2 abundance, which will be studied in vivo in mutants and under treatments related to ROS processing.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Gossens R, Kangasjärvi JS, Shapiguzov A. Redox regulation of nuclear gene expression. 2018. Poster presenterad vid The 29th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research , Turku, Finland.