The concept of commitment in explaining micro-level vitality and innovation of an sdl-network dyad

Forskningsoutput: Kapitel i bok/rapport/konferenshandlingKonferensbidragVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Service dominant logic (Vargo & Lusch, 2004, 2008, 2011 among others) has been a clear line of service science research since its introduction in Journal of Marketing in 2004. A core of the service dominant logic (SDL) is the notion that, in exchange, the service value of the “commodity” defines the value of the exchange relationship to the “customer”. While this exchange can have a monetary value definition, in the actual exchange setting, the actual valuation is done by the individual entering this exchange relationship. While value can be co-created (Gronroos et. al.) as a process, in essence, it is the valuation done by each of the exchange partners separately. Thus, valuation of the “commodity” is a perceptual matter. Further, as value can be derived from very different features of the exchange, the criteria defining the valuation can be very different from what the original producer intended. Thus, for us, the core ingredient and motivation leading the partners to an exchange relationship, i.e. the service relationship, is what we try to understand. We approach the issue from an dyadic perspective in an institutional setting. Vargo (2014) builds an institutional theory framework around the core ideas of SDL. He argues that radical innovations only happen with institutional change. In practice this means that the social system values, roles, role definitions and structures need to change in order to provide a path into new ideas, solutions and innovation. He uses the concept of network vitality to describe the generic capability of the network to enter into in-depth exchange relationships derivative of radical exchanges. Our paper makes an inquiry into this concept of vitality through the concept of commitment (and trust). We argue that the nature of the exchanges is defined by the level of commitment existing in the exchange relationship. Thus, on a very basic level of the dyad, the depth and quality of the exchange is defined by the will and ability of the partners to challenge the “exiting” wisdom. While the level of commitment (and trust) can vary between network members, and is even likely to be asymmetric, the vitality of a network is defined, on a micro-level (of the institutional theory) through the level of commitment existing. Thus, we build a basis of micro-level vitality through the concept of commitment and broaden this towards explaining innovation potential of the engagement. This is a work-in-progress paper and was inspired as a response to Vargo’s Key Note presentation in RESER 2014 (Vargo 2014).
Originalspråkengelska
Titel på gästpublikationThe 25th Annual RESER Conference "Innovative Services in the 21st Century" : Proceedings
RedaktörerJon Sundbo, Lars Fuglsang, Flemming Sørensen, Nanna Balsby
Antal sidor12
UtgivningsortKööpenhamina
FörlagRoskilde University
Utgivningsdatum25 sep 2015
ISBN (elektroniskt)978-87-7349-921-4
StatusPublicerad - 25 sep 2015
MoE-publikationstypA4 Artikel i en konferenspublikation
EvenemangEuropean association for research on services conference - Roskilde, Danmark
Varaktighet: 10 sep 201512 sep 2015
Konferensnummer: 25

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 511 Nationalekonomi

Citera det här

Berghäll, S. A. (2015). The concept of commitment in explaining micro-level vitality and innovation of an sdl-network dyad. I J. Sundbo, L. Fuglsang, F. Sørensen, & N. Balsby (Red.), The 25th Annual RESER Conference "Innovative Services in the 21st Century": Proceedings Kööpenhamina: Roskilde University.
Berghäll, Sami Alvar. / The concept of commitment in explaining micro-level vitality and innovation of an sdl-network dyad. The 25th Annual RESER Conference "Innovative Services in the 21st Century": Proceedings. redaktör / Jon Sundbo ; Lars Fuglsang ; Flemming Sørensen ; Nanna Balsby. Kööpenhamina : Roskilde University, 2015.
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Berghäll, SA 2015, The concept of commitment in explaining micro-level vitality and innovation of an sdl-network dyad. i J Sundbo, L Fuglsang, F Sørensen & N Balsby (red), The 25th Annual RESER Conference "Innovative Services in the 21st Century": Proceedings. Roskilde University, Kööpenhamina, European association for research on services conference, Roskilde, Danmark, 10/09/2015.

The concept of commitment in explaining micro-level vitality and innovation of an sdl-network dyad. / Berghäll, Sami Alvar.

The 25th Annual RESER Conference "Innovative Services in the 21st Century": Proceedings. red. / Jon Sundbo; Lars Fuglsang; Flemming Sørensen; Nanna Balsby. Kööpenhamina : Roskilde University, 2015.

Forskningsoutput: Kapitel i bok/rapport/konferenshandlingKonferensbidragVetenskapligPeer review

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T1 - The concept of commitment in explaining micro-level vitality and innovation of an sdl-network dyad

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N2 - Service dominant logic (Vargo & Lusch, 2004, 2008, 2011 among others) has been a clear line of service science research since its introduction in Journal of Marketing in 2004. A core of the service dominant logic (SDL) is the notion that, in exchange, the service value of the “commodity” defines the value of the exchange relationship to the “customer”. While this exchange can have a monetary value definition, in the actual exchange setting, the actual valuation is done by the individual entering this exchange relationship. While value can be co-created (Gronroos et. al.) as a process, in essence, it is the valuation done by each of the exchange partners separately. Thus, valuation of the “commodity” is a perceptual matter. Further, as value can be derived from very different features of the exchange, the criteria defining the valuation can be very different from what the original producer intended. Thus, for us, the core ingredient and motivation leading the partners to an exchange relationship, i.e. the service relationship, is what we try to understand. We approach the issue from an dyadic perspective in an institutional setting. Vargo (2014) builds an institutional theory framework around the core ideas of SDL. He argues that radical innovations only happen with institutional change. In practice this means that the social system values, roles, role definitions and structures need to change in order to provide a path into new ideas, solutions and innovation. He uses the concept of network vitality to describe the generic capability of the network to enter into in-depth exchange relationships derivative of radical exchanges. Our paper makes an inquiry into this concept of vitality through the concept of commitment (and trust). We argue that the nature of the exchanges is defined by the level of commitment existing in the exchange relationship. Thus, on a very basic level of the dyad, the depth and quality of the exchange is defined by the will and ability of the partners to challenge the “exiting” wisdom. While the level of commitment (and trust) can vary between network members, and is even likely to be asymmetric, the vitality of a network is defined, on a micro-level (of the institutional theory) through the level of commitment existing. Thus, we build a basis of micro-level vitality through the concept of commitment and broaden this towards explaining innovation potential of the engagement. This is a work-in-progress paper and was inspired as a response to Vargo’s Key Note presentation in RESER 2014 (Vargo 2014).

AB - Service dominant logic (Vargo & Lusch, 2004, 2008, 2011 among others) has been a clear line of service science research since its introduction in Journal of Marketing in 2004. A core of the service dominant logic (SDL) is the notion that, in exchange, the service value of the “commodity” defines the value of the exchange relationship to the “customer”. While this exchange can have a monetary value definition, in the actual exchange setting, the actual valuation is done by the individual entering this exchange relationship. While value can be co-created (Gronroos et. al.) as a process, in essence, it is the valuation done by each of the exchange partners separately. Thus, valuation of the “commodity” is a perceptual matter. Further, as value can be derived from very different features of the exchange, the criteria defining the valuation can be very different from what the original producer intended. Thus, for us, the core ingredient and motivation leading the partners to an exchange relationship, i.e. the service relationship, is what we try to understand. We approach the issue from an dyadic perspective in an institutional setting. Vargo (2014) builds an institutional theory framework around the core ideas of SDL. He argues that radical innovations only happen with institutional change. In practice this means that the social system values, roles, role definitions and structures need to change in order to provide a path into new ideas, solutions and innovation. He uses the concept of network vitality to describe the generic capability of the network to enter into in-depth exchange relationships derivative of radical exchanges. Our paper makes an inquiry into this concept of vitality through the concept of commitment (and trust). We argue that the nature of the exchanges is defined by the level of commitment existing in the exchange relationship. Thus, on a very basic level of the dyad, the depth and quality of the exchange is defined by the will and ability of the partners to challenge the “exiting” wisdom. While the level of commitment (and trust) can vary between network members, and is even likely to be asymmetric, the vitality of a network is defined, on a micro-level (of the institutional theory) through the level of commitment existing. Thus, we build a basis of micro-level vitality through the concept of commitment and broaden this towards explaining innovation potential of the engagement. This is a work-in-progress paper and was inspired as a response to Vargo’s Key Note presentation in RESER 2014 (Vargo 2014).

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A2 - Sundbo, Jon

A2 - Fuglsang, Lars

A2 - Sørensen, Flemming

A2 - Balsby, Nanna

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Berghäll SA. The concept of commitment in explaining micro-level vitality and innovation of an sdl-network dyad. I Sundbo J, Fuglsang L, Sørensen F, Balsby N, redaktörer, The 25th Annual RESER Conference "Innovative Services in the 21st Century": Proceedings. Kööpenhamina: Roskilde University. 2015