The relation between value priorities and proneness to guilt, shame, and empathy

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    Sammanfattning

    The relations of value priorities (the Schwartz Value Survey) to guilt, shame (Tangney's Test of Self-Conscious Affect) and empathy (Davis' Interpersonal Reactivity Index) were examined in two samples, one of 15-19-year-old secondary school students (N = 207), and the other of military conscripts (N = 503). As hypothesized, guilt-proneness was, in both samples, positively related to valuing universalism, benevolence, tradition, and conformity, and negatively related to valuing power, hedonism, stimulation, and self-direction. The results for empathic concern and perspective-taking were similar, but their relation to the openness-conservation value dimension was weaker. Shame and personal distress were weakly related to values, suggesting that voluntary control is less important for these tendencies. In general, self-transcendence and conservation values seem compatible with prosocial tendencies, whereas self-enhancement and openness do not.
    Originalspråkengelska
    TidskriftMotivation and Emotion
    Volym32
    Utgåva2
    Sidor (från-till)69-80
    Antal sidor12
    ISSN0146-7239
    DOI
    StatusPublicerad - 2008
    MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

    Vetenskapsgrenar

    • 515 Psykologi

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    title = "The relation between value priorities and proneness to guilt, shame, and empathy",
    abstract = "The relations of value priorities (the Schwartz Value Survey) to guilt, shame (Tangney's Test of Self-Conscious Affect) and empathy (Davis' Interpersonal Reactivity Index) were examined in two samples, one of 15-19-year-old secondary school students (N = 207), and the other of military conscripts (N = 503). As hypothesized, guilt-proneness was, in both samples, positively related to valuing universalism, benevolence, tradition, and conformity, and negatively related to valuing power, hedonism, stimulation, and self-direction. The results for empathic concern and perspective-taking were similar, but their relation to the openness-conservation value dimension was weaker. Shame and personal distress were weakly related to values, suggesting that voluntary control is less important for these tendencies. In general, self-transcendence and conservation values seem compatible with prosocial tendencies, whereas self-enhancement and openness do not.",
    keywords = "515 Psychology",
    author = "Mia Silfver-Kuhalampi and Klaus Helkama and Jan-Erik L{\"o}nnqvist and Markku Verkasalo",
    year = "2008",
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    T1 - The relation between value priorities and proneness to guilt, shame, and empathy

    AU - Silfver-Kuhalampi, Mia

    AU - Helkama, Klaus

    AU - Lönnqvist, Jan-Erik

    AU - Verkasalo, Markku

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    N2 - The relations of value priorities (the Schwartz Value Survey) to guilt, shame (Tangney's Test of Self-Conscious Affect) and empathy (Davis' Interpersonal Reactivity Index) were examined in two samples, one of 15-19-year-old secondary school students (N = 207), and the other of military conscripts (N = 503). As hypothesized, guilt-proneness was, in both samples, positively related to valuing universalism, benevolence, tradition, and conformity, and negatively related to valuing power, hedonism, stimulation, and self-direction. The results for empathic concern and perspective-taking were similar, but their relation to the openness-conservation value dimension was weaker. Shame and personal distress were weakly related to values, suggesting that voluntary control is less important for these tendencies. In general, self-transcendence and conservation values seem compatible with prosocial tendencies, whereas self-enhancement and openness do not.

    AB - The relations of value priorities (the Schwartz Value Survey) to guilt, shame (Tangney's Test of Self-Conscious Affect) and empathy (Davis' Interpersonal Reactivity Index) were examined in two samples, one of 15-19-year-old secondary school students (N = 207), and the other of military conscripts (N = 503). As hypothesized, guilt-proneness was, in both samples, positively related to valuing universalism, benevolence, tradition, and conformity, and negatively related to valuing power, hedonism, stimulation, and self-direction. The results for empathic concern and perspective-taking were similar, but their relation to the openness-conservation value dimension was weaker. Shame and personal distress were weakly related to values, suggesting that voluntary control is less important for these tendencies. In general, self-transcendence and conservation values seem compatible with prosocial tendencies, whereas self-enhancement and openness do not.

    KW - 515 Psychology

    U2 - 10.1007/s11031-008-9084-2

    DO - 10.1007/s11031-008-9084-2

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    JO - Motivation and Emotion

    JF - Motivation and Emotion

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