Why Do Users Issue Good Queries? Neural Correlates of Term Specificity

Forskningsoutput: Kapitel i bok/rapport/konferenshandlingKonferensbidragVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Despite advances in the past few decades in studying what kind of queries users input to search engines and how to suggest queries for the users, the fundamental question of what makes human cognition able to estimate goodness of query terms is largely unanswered. For example, a person searching information about "cats" is able to choose query terms, such as "housecat", "feline", or "animal" and avoid terms like "similar", "variety", and "distinguish". We investigated the association between the specificity of terms occurring in documents and human brain activity measured via electroencephalography (EEG). We analyzed the brain activity data of fifteen participants, recorded in response to reading terms from Wikipedia documents. Term specificity was shown to be associated with the amplitude of evoked brain responses. The results indicate that by being able to determine which terms carry maximal information about, and can best discriminate between, documents, people have the capability to enter good query terms. Moreover, our results suggest that the effective query term selection process, often observed in practical search behavior studies, has a neural basis. We believe our findings constitute an important step in revealing the cognitive processing behind query formulation and evaluating informativeness of language in general.

Originalspråkengelska
Titel på gästpublikationProceedings of the 42Nd International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval
Antal sidor10
UtgivningsortNew York, NY, USA
FörlagACM, Association for Computing Machinery
Utgivningsdatum2019
Sidor375-384
ISBN (tryckt)978-1-4503-6172-9
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 2019
MoE-publikationstypA4 Artikel i en konferenspublikation
Evenemang42nd International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval - Paris, Frankrike
Varaktighet: 21 jul 201925 jul 2019
Konferensnummer: 42

Publikationsserier

NamnSIGIR'19
FörlagACM

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 113 Data- och informationsvetenskap

Citera det här

Kangassalo, L., Spapé, M., Jacucci, G., & Ruotsalo, T. (2019). Why Do Users Issue Good Queries? Neural Correlates of Term Specificity. I Proceedings of the 42Nd International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval (s. 375-384). (SIGIR'19). New York, NY, USA: ACM, Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/3331184.3331243
Kangassalo, Lauri ; Spapé, Michiel ; Jacucci, Giulio ; Ruotsalo, Tuukka. / Why Do Users Issue Good Queries? Neural Correlates of Term Specificity. Proceedings of the 42Nd International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval. New York, NY, USA : ACM, Association for Computing Machinery, 2019. s. 375-384 (SIGIR'19).
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title = "Why Do Users Issue Good Queries?: Neural Correlates of Term Specificity",
abstract = "Despite advances in the past few decades in studying what kind of queries users input to search engines and how to suggest queries for the users, the fundamental question of what makes human cognition able to estimate goodness of query terms is largely unanswered. For example, a person searching information about {"}cats{"} is able to choose query terms, such as {"}housecat{"}, {"}feline{"}, or {"}animal{"} and avoid terms like {"}similar{"}, {"}variety{"}, and {"}distinguish{"}. We investigated the association between the specificity of terms occurring in documents and human brain activity measured via electroencephalography (EEG). We analyzed the brain activity data of fifteen participants, recorded in response to reading terms from Wikipedia documents. Term specificity was shown to be associated with the amplitude of evoked brain responses. The results indicate that by being able to determine which terms carry maximal information about, and can best discriminate between, documents, people have the capability to enter good query terms. Moreover, our results suggest that the effective query term selection process, often observed in practical search behavior studies, has a neural basis. We believe our findings constitute an important step in revealing the cognitive processing behind query formulation and evaluating informativeness of language in general.",
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Kangassalo, L, Spapé, M, Jacucci, G & Ruotsalo, T 2019, Why Do Users Issue Good Queries? Neural Correlates of Term Specificity. i Proceedings of the 42Nd International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval. SIGIR'19, ACM, Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, s. 375-384, 42nd International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval, Paris, Frankrike, 21/07/2019. https://doi.org/10.1145/3331184.3331243

Why Do Users Issue Good Queries? Neural Correlates of Term Specificity. / Kangassalo, Lauri; Spapé, Michiel; Jacucci, Giulio; Ruotsalo, Tuukka.

Proceedings of the 42Nd International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval. New York, NY, USA : ACM, Association for Computing Machinery, 2019. s. 375-384 (SIGIR'19).

Forskningsoutput: Kapitel i bok/rapport/konferenshandlingKonferensbidragVetenskapligPeer review

TY - GEN

T1 - Why Do Users Issue Good Queries?

T2 - Neural Correlates of Term Specificity

AU - Kangassalo, Lauri

AU - Spapé, Michiel

AU - Jacucci, Giulio

AU - Ruotsalo, Tuukka

N1 - JUFO2

PY - 2019

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N2 - Despite advances in the past few decades in studying what kind of queries users input to search engines and how to suggest queries for the users, the fundamental question of what makes human cognition able to estimate goodness of query terms is largely unanswered. For example, a person searching information about "cats" is able to choose query terms, such as "housecat", "feline", or "animal" and avoid terms like "similar", "variety", and "distinguish". We investigated the association between the specificity of terms occurring in documents and human brain activity measured via electroencephalography (EEG). We analyzed the brain activity data of fifteen participants, recorded in response to reading terms from Wikipedia documents. Term specificity was shown to be associated with the amplitude of evoked brain responses. The results indicate that by being able to determine which terms carry maximal information about, and can best discriminate between, documents, people have the capability to enter good query terms. Moreover, our results suggest that the effective query term selection process, often observed in practical search behavior studies, has a neural basis. We believe our findings constitute an important step in revealing the cognitive processing behind query formulation and evaluating informativeness of language in general.

AB - Despite advances in the past few decades in studying what kind of queries users input to search engines and how to suggest queries for the users, the fundamental question of what makes human cognition able to estimate goodness of query terms is largely unanswered. For example, a person searching information about "cats" is able to choose query terms, such as "housecat", "feline", or "animal" and avoid terms like "similar", "variety", and "distinguish". We investigated the association between the specificity of terms occurring in documents and human brain activity measured via electroencephalography (EEG). We analyzed the brain activity data of fifteen participants, recorded in response to reading terms from Wikipedia documents. Term specificity was shown to be associated with the amplitude of evoked brain responses. The results indicate that by being able to determine which terms carry maximal information about, and can best discriminate between, documents, people have the capability to enter good query terms. Moreover, our results suggest that the effective query term selection process, often observed in practical search behavior studies, has a neural basis. We believe our findings constitute an important step in revealing the cognitive processing behind query formulation and evaluating informativeness of language in general.

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BT - Proceedings of the 42Nd International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval

PB - ACM, Association for Computing Machinery

CY - New York, NY, USA

ER -

Kangassalo L, Spapé M, Jacucci G, Ruotsalo T. Why Do Users Issue Good Queries? Neural Correlates of Term Specificity. I Proceedings of the 42Nd International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval. New York, NY, USA: ACM, Association for Computing Machinery. 2019. s. 375-384. (SIGIR'19). https://doi.org/10.1145/3331184.3331243