Work Demands and Resources, Stress Regulation and Quality of Pedagogical Work Among Professionals in Finnish Early Childhood Education Settings

Mari Nislin, Nina Sajaniemi, Eira Suhonen, Margaret Sims, Risto Hotulainen, Sirpa Hyttinen, Ari Hyttinen

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

This study examined early childhood professionals’ (ECPs) stress regulation and the demands and resources they encounter at work, and considered how these factors are associated with the quality of pedagogical work in daycare. The participants were 117 ECPs from 24 daycare centers in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland, with data collected using surveys, cortisol measurements, and observational assessments. The results indicated that the professionals generally found their work resources to be adequate and, on average, their stress regulation measured through cortisol activity showed a typical diurnal pattern. Highly important resources at work proved to be support from supervisors, which was associated with stress regulation and the quality of pedagogical work in teams. Although we found only minor associations between cortisol activity and job demands and resources, cortisol activity did relate to pedagogical work, particularly to teamwork; the higher the quality of the teamwork, the lower the ECPs morning cortisol values. Our multidisciplinary study highlights important findings regarding the resources and demands ECPs experience at work, and supports existing literature. In addition, the results demonstrate the importance of social support, especially the role of the supervisor, which proved to be one of the key factors positively enhancing well-being at work. These findings are applicable in planning interventions regarding workrelated well-being among ECPs.
Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftJournal of Early Childhood Education Research
Volym4
Utgåva1
Sidor (från-till)42-66
Antal sidor25
ISSN2323-7414
StatusPublicerad - 5 okt 2015
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 515 Psykologi
  • 516 Pedagogik

Citera det här

@article{45673258b6a8424190c86bbde8df3b87,
title = "Work Demands and Resources, Stress Regulation and Quality of Pedagogical Work Among Professionals in Finnish Early Childhood Education Settings",
abstract = "This study examined early childhood professionals’ (ECPs) stress regulation and the demands and resources they encounter at work, and considered how these factors are associated with the quality of pedagogical work in daycare. The participants were 117 ECPs from 24 daycare centers in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland, with data collected using surveys, cortisol measurements, and observational assessments. The results indicated that the professionals generally found their work resources to be adequate and, on average, their stress regulation measured through cortisol activity showed a typical diurnal pattern. Highly important resources at work proved to be support from supervisors, which was associated with stress regulation and the quality of pedagogical work in teams. Although we found only minor associations between cortisol activity and job demands and resources, cortisol activity did relate to pedagogical work, particularly to teamwork; the higher the quality of the teamwork, the lower the ECPs morning cortisol values. Our multidisciplinary study highlights important findings regarding the resources and demands ECPs experience at work, and supports existing literature. In addition, the results demonstrate the importance of social support, especially the role of the supervisor, which proved to be one of the key factors positively enhancing well-being at work. These findings are applicable in planning interventions regarding workrelated well-being among ECPs.",
keywords = "515 Psychology, 516 Educational sciences",
author = "Mari Nislin and Nina Sajaniemi and Eira Suhonen and Margaret Sims and Risto Hotulainen and Sirpa Hyttinen and Ari Hyttinen",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
day = "5",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "42--66",
journal = "Journal of Early Childhood Education Research",
issn = "2323-7414",
publisher = "Suomen varhaiskasvatus",
number = "1",

}

Work Demands and Resources, Stress Regulation and Quality of Pedagogical Work Among Professionals in Finnish Early Childhood Education Settings. / Nislin, Mari; Sajaniemi, Nina; Suhonen, Eira; Sims, Margaret; Hotulainen, Risto; Hyttinen, Sirpa; Hyttinen, Ari.

I: Journal of Early Childhood Education Research, Vol. 4, Nr. 1, 05.10.2015, s. 42-66.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Work Demands and Resources, Stress Regulation and Quality of Pedagogical Work Among Professionals in Finnish Early Childhood Education Settings

AU - Nislin, Mari

AU - Sajaniemi, Nina

AU - Suhonen, Eira

AU - Sims, Margaret

AU - Hotulainen, Risto

AU - Hyttinen, Sirpa

AU - Hyttinen, Ari

PY - 2015/10/5

Y1 - 2015/10/5

N2 - This study examined early childhood professionals’ (ECPs) stress regulation and the demands and resources they encounter at work, and considered how these factors are associated with the quality of pedagogical work in daycare. The participants were 117 ECPs from 24 daycare centers in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland, with data collected using surveys, cortisol measurements, and observational assessments. The results indicated that the professionals generally found their work resources to be adequate and, on average, their stress regulation measured through cortisol activity showed a typical diurnal pattern. Highly important resources at work proved to be support from supervisors, which was associated with stress regulation and the quality of pedagogical work in teams. Although we found only minor associations between cortisol activity and job demands and resources, cortisol activity did relate to pedagogical work, particularly to teamwork; the higher the quality of the teamwork, the lower the ECPs morning cortisol values. Our multidisciplinary study highlights important findings regarding the resources and demands ECPs experience at work, and supports existing literature. In addition, the results demonstrate the importance of social support, especially the role of the supervisor, which proved to be one of the key factors positively enhancing well-being at work. These findings are applicable in planning interventions regarding workrelated well-being among ECPs.

AB - This study examined early childhood professionals’ (ECPs) stress regulation and the demands and resources they encounter at work, and considered how these factors are associated with the quality of pedagogical work in daycare. The participants were 117 ECPs from 24 daycare centers in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland, with data collected using surveys, cortisol measurements, and observational assessments. The results indicated that the professionals generally found their work resources to be adequate and, on average, their stress regulation measured through cortisol activity showed a typical diurnal pattern. Highly important resources at work proved to be support from supervisors, which was associated with stress regulation and the quality of pedagogical work in teams. Although we found only minor associations between cortisol activity and job demands and resources, cortisol activity did relate to pedagogical work, particularly to teamwork; the higher the quality of the teamwork, the lower the ECPs morning cortisol values. Our multidisciplinary study highlights important findings regarding the resources and demands ECPs experience at work, and supports existing literature. In addition, the results demonstrate the importance of social support, especially the role of the supervisor, which proved to be one of the key factors positively enhancing well-being at work. These findings are applicable in planning interventions regarding workrelated well-being among ECPs.

KW - 515 Psychology

KW - 516 Educational sciences

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 42

EP - 66

JO - Journal of Early Childhood Education Research

JF - Journal of Early Childhood Education Research

SN - 2323-7414

IS - 1

ER -