Young people’s everyday lives in the city

living and experiencing daily places

Heli Johanna Ponto

Forskningsoutput: AvhandlingDoktorsavhandlingMonografi

Sammanfattning

This study, positioned in the fields of humanistic geography and young people’s geographies, deals with young people’s place experiences in the city. I consider such experiences subjective, and study place from the perspective of personal relations and experienced insideness and outsideness. I also understand place as an intersubjective experience comprising social encounters. My research contributes to the literature on mobility, specifically in examining place from the perspective of daily mobility and personal networks. The participants were young people in upper-secondary education in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland. The research material consists of go-along interviews, photographs, GPS recordings and independent assignments, gathered in accordance with participatory methods. Earlier research findings indicate that adults define and restrict young people’s places in urban space, and that their experiences of insideness and outsideness are strongly elated to other meaningful social encounters. Daily mobility also tends to be perceived as a bodily and routine practice, whereas mobility opportunities are connected to young people’s experienced independence. According to the participants, socio-spatial tensions that typically arise between adults and young people no longer influenced the construction of their place experiences. The meanings of familiar childhood places, used for activities such as hanging out, changed as these young people were more commonly encountered as ‘almost adults’ in different places. Childhood places still evoked strong memories, but were no longer at the centre of daily life. They still had a significant bridge-building role in reconciling memories of familiar childhood places with contradictory experiences of new adulthood places. Thus, I claim that young people are experientially living between their childhood and adulthood places, actively constructing new personal places in their everyday environments in the process of growing up. The young people emphasised the importance of friends in fostering feelings of insideness with place. Groups of friends had their private ‘our’ places, but also more open places in which ‘they’ were welcome. Meetings with ‘them’ were easier if friends were present. Social encounters sometimes evoked strong feelings of outsideness despite the presence of friends, however, especially if such feelings were shared. Nevertheless, those who had the skills and resources to handle experiences related to encounters with different people in their daily places seemed to retain their feelings of insideness. My findings reveal that the construction of (inter)subjective meanings of places is tightly intertwined with daily mobility. The young people described how daily moving structured the experiential and bodily connections between them and their places, supporting their way of living and being in the city and enabling them to practise new adulthood. They had plenty of freedom related to daily, bodily mobility, and were restricted by a poor public-transport network, and the lack of a driving licence and vehicle, rather than parental strictures. Daily places form webs of meaningful places and experienced (dis)connections between places and people, in which (inter)subjective meaning-making is intermingled with daily mobilities. Given that experienced disconnections appear to arouse feelings of outsideness, young people should learn to recognize their experiential ties with places and handle the breakages. To do this they need places that support their everyday agency in terms of actively influencing their personal connections with places and promoting feelings of insideness.
Originalspråkengelska
Tilldelande institution
  • Helsingfors universitet
Handledare
  • Vaattovaara, Mari Kaarina, Handledare
  • Tani, Sirpa, Handledare
Tilldelningsdatum18 aug 2017
UtgivningsortHelsinki
Förlag
Tryckta ISBN978-951-51-2927-7
Elektroniska ISBN978-951-51-2928-4
StatusPublicerad - 18 aug 2017
MoE-publikationstypG4 Doktorsavhandling (monografi)

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 519 Socialgeografi och ekonomisk geografi

Citera det här

Ponto, H. J. (2017). Young people’s everyday lives in the city: living and experiencing daily places. Helsinki: University of Helsinki.
Ponto, Heli Johanna. / Young people’s everyday lives in the city : living and experiencing daily places. Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2017. 156 s.
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title = "Young people’s everyday lives in the city: living and experiencing daily places",
abstract = "This study, positioned in the fields of humanistic geography and young people’s geographies, deals with young people’s place experiences in the city. I consider such experiences subjective, and study place from the perspective of personal relations and experienced insideness and outsideness. I also understand place as an intersubjective experience comprising social encounters. My research contributes to the literature on mobility, specifically in examining place from the perspective of daily mobility and personal networks. The participants were young people in upper-secondary education in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland. The research material consists of go-along interviews, photographs, GPS recordings and independent assignments, gathered in accordance with participatory methods. Earlier research findings indicate that adults define and restrict young people’s places in urban space, and that their experiences of insideness and outsideness are strongly elated to other meaningful social encounters. Daily mobility also tends to be perceived as a bodily and routine practice, whereas mobility opportunities are connected to young people’s experienced independence. According to the participants, socio-spatial tensions that typically arise between adults and young people no longer influenced the construction of their place experiences. The meanings of familiar childhood places, used for activities such as hanging out, changed as these young people were more commonly encountered as ‘almost adults’ in different places. Childhood places still evoked strong memories, but were no longer at the centre of daily life. They still had a significant bridge-building role in reconciling memories of familiar childhood places with contradictory experiences of new adulthood places. Thus, I claim that young people are experientially living between their childhood and adulthood places, actively constructing new personal places in their everyday environments in the process of growing up. The young people emphasised the importance of friends in fostering feelings of insideness with place. Groups of friends had their private ‘our’ places, but also more open places in which ‘they’ were welcome. Meetings with ‘them’ were easier if friends were present. Social encounters sometimes evoked strong feelings of outsideness despite the presence of friends, however, especially if such feelings were shared. Nevertheless, those who had the skills and resources to handle experiences related to encounters with different people in their daily places seemed to retain their feelings of insideness. My findings reveal that the construction of (inter)subjective meanings of places is tightly intertwined with daily mobility. The young people described how daily moving structured the experiential and bodily connections between them and their places, supporting their way of living and being in the city and enabling them to practise new adulthood. They had plenty of freedom related to daily, bodily mobility, and were restricted by a poor public-transport network, and the lack of a driving licence and vehicle, rather than parental strictures. Daily places form webs of meaningful places and experienced (dis)connections between places and people, in which (inter)subjective meaning-making is intermingled with daily mobilities. Given that experienced disconnections appear to arouse feelings of outsideness, young people should learn to recognize their experiential ties with places and handle the breakages. To do this they need places that support their everyday agency in terms of actively influencing their personal connections with places and promoting feelings of insideness.",
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Ponto, HJ 2017, 'Young people’s everyday lives in the city: living and experiencing daily places', Helsingfors universitet, Helsinki.

Young people’s everyday lives in the city : living and experiencing daily places. / Ponto, Heli Johanna.

Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2017. 156 s.

Forskningsoutput: AvhandlingDoktorsavhandlingMonografi

TY - THES

T1 - Young people’s everyday lives in the city

T2 - living and experiencing daily places

AU - Ponto, Heli Johanna

PY - 2017/8/18

Y1 - 2017/8/18

N2 - This study, positioned in the fields of humanistic geography and young people’s geographies, deals with young people’s place experiences in the city. I consider such experiences subjective, and study place from the perspective of personal relations and experienced insideness and outsideness. I also understand place as an intersubjective experience comprising social encounters. My research contributes to the literature on mobility, specifically in examining place from the perspective of daily mobility and personal networks. The participants were young people in upper-secondary education in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland. The research material consists of go-along interviews, photographs, GPS recordings and independent assignments, gathered in accordance with participatory methods. Earlier research findings indicate that adults define and restrict young people’s places in urban space, and that their experiences of insideness and outsideness are strongly elated to other meaningful social encounters. Daily mobility also tends to be perceived as a bodily and routine practice, whereas mobility opportunities are connected to young people’s experienced independence. According to the participants, socio-spatial tensions that typically arise between adults and young people no longer influenced the construction of their place experiences. The meanings of familiar childhood places, used for activities such as hanging out, changed as these young people were more commonly encountered as ‘almost adults’ in different places. Childhood places still evoked strong memories, but were no longer at the centre of daily life. They still had a significant bridge-building role in reconciling memories of familiar childhood places with contradictory experiences of new adulthood places. Thus, I claim that young people are experientially living between their childhood and adulthood places, actively constructing new personal places in their everyday environments in the process of growing up. The young people emphasised the importance of friends in fostering feelings of insideness with place. Groups of friends had their private ‘our’ places, but also more open places in which ‘they’ were welcome. Meetings with ‘them’ were easier if friends were present. Social encounters sometimes evoked strong feelings of outsideness despite the presence of friends, however, especially if such feelings were shared. Nevertheless, those who had the skills and resources to handle experiences related to encounters with different people in their daily places seemed to retain their feelings of insideness. My findings reveal that the construction of (inter)subjective meanings of places is tightly intertwined with daily mobility. The young people described how daily moving structured the experiential and bodily connections between them and their places, supporting their way of living and being in the city and enabling them to practise new adulthood. They had plenty of freedom related to daily, bodily mobility, and were restricted by a poor public-transport network, and the lack of a driving licence and vehicle, rather than parental strictures. Daily places form webs of meaningful places and experienced (dis)connections between places and people, in which (inter)subjective meaning-making is intermingled with daily mobilities. Given that experienced disconnections appear to arouse feelings of outsideness, young people should learn to recognize their experiential ties with places and handle the breakages. To do this they need places that support their everyday agency in terms of actively influencing their personal connections with places and promoting feelings of insideness.

AB - This study, positioned in the fields of humanistic geography and young people’s geographies, deals with young people’s place experiences in the city. I consider such experiences subjective, and study place from the perspective of personal relations and experienced insideness and outsideness. I also understand place as an intersubjective experience comprising social encounters. My research contributes to the literature on mobility, specifically in examining place from the perspective of daily mobility and personal networks. The participants were young people in upper-secondary education in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland. The research material consists of go-along interviews, photographs, GPS recordings and independent assignments, gathered in accordance with participatory methods. Earlier research findings indicate that adults define and restrict young people’s places in urban space, and that their experiences of insideness and outsideness are strongly elated to other meaningful social encounters. Daily mobility also tends to be perceived as a bodily and routine practice, whereas mobility opportunities are connected to young people’s experienced independence. According to the participants, socio-spatial tensions that typically arise between adults and young people no longer influenced the construction of their place experiences. The meanings of familiar childhood places, used for activities such as hanging out, changed as these young people were more commonly encountered as ‘almost adults’ in different places. Childhood places still evoked strong memories, but were no longer at the centre of daily life. They still had a significant bridge-building role in reconciling memories of familiar childhood places with contradictory experiences of new adulthood places. Thus, I claim that young people are experientially living between their childhood and adulthood places, actively constructing new personal places in their everyday environments in the process of growing up. The young people emphasised the importance of friends in fostering feelings of insideness with place. Groups of friends had their private ‘our’ places, but also more open places in which ‘they’ were welcome. Meetings with ‘them’ were easier if friends were present. Social encounters sometimes evoked strong feelings of outsideness despite the presence of friends, however, especially if such feelings were shared. Nevertheless, those who had the skills and resources to handle experiences related to encounters with different people in their daily places seemed to retain their feelings of insideness. My findings reveal that the construction of (inter)subjective meanings of places is tightly intertwined with daily mobility. The young people described how daily moving structured the experiential and bodily connections between them and their places, supporting their way of living and being in the city and enabling them to practise new adulthood. They had plenty of freedom related to daily, bodily mobility, and were restricted by a poor public-transport network, and the lack of a driving licence and vehicle, rather than parental strictures. Daily places form webs of meaningful places and experienced (dis)connections between places and people, in which (inter)subjective meaning-making is intermingled with daily mobilities. Given that experienced disconnections appear to arouse feelings of outsideness, young people should learn to recognize their experiential ties with places and handle the breakages. To do this they need places that support their everyday agency in terms of actively influencing their personal connections with places and promoting feelings of insideness.

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KW - young people

KW - place experiences

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KW - everyday life

KW - urban space

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T3 - Department of Geosciences and Geography. A

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Ponto HJ. Young people’s everyday lives in the city: living and experiencing daily places. Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2017. 156 s. (Department of Geosciences and Geography. A; 52).